177 Reviews for 2018 Edinburgh Fringe Festival (In order from most enjoyable to least)

 

Welcome to the 2018 version of my Fringe reviews.   To reduce my review load, I now write only one or two sentence  reviews for  shows below 4 stars.  Those that read this probably don’t care about them anyway.  If you happen to be from one of the three star, and wish a complete review, then just e-mail me.

The first four days, and the weekends my travel companion, Melissa, and I chose the plays.  My friend Debbie had a lot say abou the 5th to the 11th.  She has broader taste than I, so the selection is more diverse than I would choose.  I tailored the days of the weekdays between the of 13th to the 24th to that of my friend Tim.  He is much more knowledgeable about the production qualities of the companies.  You can see my 2018 schedule.  You can find out about me, and my extended thoughts about reviewing at the bottom of this page.  I think that the most useful aspect for my readers is the rankings.  I base the rankings on my enjoyment of the show, so they may not reflect the quality of the script and/or acting.  I prefer plays to comedy acts, but work in a little of the latter for diversity.  I have discovered that I have a penchant for true stories.  The comments are usually only three sentences long because I have little time between shows, and, after all, I am here for the shows.  You can also see my 151 reviews for 2017 Fringe, 171 reviews for 2016 Fringe, 189 reviews for 2015 Fringe, 165 reviews for 2014 Fringe, 152 reviews for 2013 Fringe, 135 reviews for 2012 Fringe, 175 reviews for 2011 Fringe, 200 reviews for 2010 Fringe, 177 reviews for 2009 Fringe,  162 reviews for 2006 Fringe, and 151 reviews for 2005 Fringe.  I always enjoy chatting with both audience members and dramatic artists.  If you wish to contact me, send e-mail to Sean Davis.

Because I have less free time this year, my reviews may be shorter than in previous years.  I have tried to give 5-star shows the full three-sentence treatment, and will add more information about the 4-star shows later this week as I catch up.  You can change the sorting column of the table below by first clicking anywhere in its header.  Each succeeding click in the header sorts the table by the column clicked.  Succeeding clicks of a column will reverse the previous sort order.  I have now added a Date column on the right so that returning viewers can sort by it to see my most recent reviews.

 

Rank

Review

Venue

Begins

Ends

Date

        1. 

My Left/Right Foot (*****)

An acting club tries to win a competition by developing a musical based on “My Left Foot,” the autobiography of a man who suffers from cerebral palsy from birth.  Instead of celebrating the accomplishment of one man, like the movie does, this play uses the competitive drive of the diverse characters of the club to promote including disabled people by looking beyond their disabilities.   Great voices, wonderful songs, several subplots, and a surprisingly light touch make this both fun, and uplifting. 

Assembly Roxy

18:10

19:40

20

        2. 

Black and White Tea Room Counsellor (*****)

In Korea, a young man arrives for his first appointment with a counselor who has had great success with clients by developing their trust.  Though we had supertitles, the two men’s non-verbal language was so clear, understanding their words often seemed superfluous.   While the acting is superb, the plot kept our attention locked to the stage as the cogent story unfolded.

Assembly Rooms

12:10

13:10

24

        3. 

The Song of Lunch (*****)

After many years, a book editor arranges to have dinner with an old flame.  The lyrical prose and her sharp style make this an elegant piece with every word and move precisely conveying the subtlety (and lack of subtlety) of the two characters.  The unique shadow puppet-like videos in the background contribute to the art gallery elegance of the piece.

Pleasance Courtyard

14:20

15:10

14

        4. 

Mark Thomas - Check Up: Our NHS at 70 (*****)

Thomas researched the NHS by interviewing health officials, observing medical workers in a variety of situations, and talking to a GP about his own medical future.  He combines this all into a fact filled, sincere, but humorous show that well argues his point that the NHS and its supporting systems are not working as well as Brits think, and has reached a point that it will only get worse if funding is not increased, and its structure changed.  While his anecdotes reflect his appreciation of the medical professionals well to show that the workers are not at fault, it his statistics about the poor outcomes for cancers in comparison to other countries that really proves his point that change is needed.

Traverse

10:00

11:25

5

        5. 

Underground Railroad Games (*****)

A Black woman and a White man use a game to educate their students about slavery before the Civil War while the pair have a tempestuous affair that harkens back to the sexual dynamics of that time.  Just as the game is a clever device with which to educate the students (and audience), the couple’s interactions cleverly reveal the racial relationships of that past, and the present.  The graphic sex forces us to acknowledge the complexity of the sexual relations under slavery, including the wet nursing by slaves, in one scene, and the utter power of the master to dehumanize a slave in another scene.   

Traverse

10:00

11:25

16

        6. 

Heroine (*****)

MJ Wells portrays true story of a lesbian who joined the U.S. Army in 2000, and then had to deal with sexual abuse, and PTSD.  Whether dealing with a lover in a “Don’t ask, don’t tell” army, or trying to recover from her experience in Iraq, she keeps the show real and riveting.  The ambush scene that includes dealing with her tormentor at the same time is a great mix of action, honor, and her thoughts at the time. 

Assembly Hall (Rainy)

12:00

13:05

2

        7. 

Entropy (*****)

A troubled teenager returns home and makes demands on his foster mother.  The play is striking for its interplay between the young man seeking both revenge and love, and the mother’s fear, denial, and love.  While the story is powerful, the little touches, like him looking at his toys, or her subtly adjusting her dress keep the tension taut throughout.

Underbelly Bristo Square

19:15

20:15

6

        8. 

And Before I Forget I Love You, I Love You (*****)

Pip Upton assumes the roles of a husband/caregiver, sufferer, and son who must deal with Alzheimer’s disease as it impacts their lives in different ways.  Each portrayal brought tears to my eyes.  He cleverly uses his only props, supposed notes for funeral and birthday speeches, to demonstrate the mental state of the speaker.

Pleasance Courtyard

14:00

15:00

11

        9. 

Pussy Riot: Riot Days (*****)

The Russian political punk band plays its music and tells its tale of repression while videos of their struggles play on a screen behind them.  The music is not to my taste, but the thought of seeing people who have resisted the Russian government to the point of being in the gulags for two years is riveting.  Hearing, and seeing how they planned and carried out their effort to play music for a few moments in a cathedral to protest the Archbishop’s deal with Putin was awe inspiring.

Summerhall

19:00

22:00

11

      10. 

Island Town (*****)

Three close teenagers feel trapped in their isolated town share everything with each other.  Both the causes of their discomfort and their efforts to efforts to find solace are finely written and performed.  While there is tragedy in each of their lives, they find fun often enough to allow their pain to be keenly felt.

Summerhall

11:30

12:40

22

      11. 

Di & Viv & Rose (In an Hour) by Ameilia Bullmore (*****)

Though they barely know each other, a lesbian, an intellectual, and a free spirit, Rose, move into a house just bought by Rose’s uncle.  Though this could have been just another college years Fringe story, the women’s stories are more nuanced, and the stories of their lives after college are anything but trite.  As with most plays in this setting an unexpected pregnancy occurs, but Bullmore wisely doesn’t allow it to dominate the story.

C Cubed

17:55

18:55

2

      12. 

In Addition (*****)

A twenty something couple try to make ends meet while dealing with parents, depression, and a tenuous job.  The play revealed to me how social media may present social and employment opportunities that integrated into the lives of young workers, but they still must deal with the same problems we all have had.  The love between the couple is clear even though his depression often hides his.

Underbelly Cowgate

10:50

11:50

11

      13. 

Dangerous Giant Animals (*****)

Of all the family members, a middle sister deals with her younger sister’s mental disability best, but the role has repercussions.  We learn how she deals with her sister’s limited mental abilities and rage, and how these disabilities affect the family dynamics.  The story is remarkable for its balance of love, sacrifice, and self-awareness.

Underbelly Cowgate

12:00

12:55

3

      14. 

Build a Rocket (*****)

A woman relives each year of her life from becoming pregnant at sixteen to raising her son until he’s taken his GCSEs.  While this story has been told many times at the Fringe, the year by year script and her range combine to make the story fresh and powerful.  From joy to exhaustion to frustration, her life is a whirlwind that she can tame only some of the time.

Pleasance Courtyard

16:30

17:30

20

      15. 

The Swell Mob (*****)

This immersive production used the Assembly Underground area and 16 actors to recreate an 1830s tavern complete with Faro, a bar, a boxing ring, gypsy fortune tellers, pick pockets, flash mobs of dance routines, and the removal of a soul from a denizen.   The wide range of activities, and the surreptitious guidance of several lowlifes easily drew even the most self-conscious audience member into the scenario.  I loved that offering a tip to the Faro dealer lead to him reciprocating by cheating for me on the next bet.

Assembly George Square

19:45

21:00

26

      16. 

Out of the Blue (*****)

The twelve guys from Oxford were back with their great songs and choreographed hijinks for another great show.  One of my traditions is to see them on the last day of the Fringe when they are decked out in kilts, and they are aware that it is their last concert before this group disbands.  Besides the music, it is always touching to see their camaraderie.

Assembly George Square

14:40

15:40

27

      17. 

Daughter (*****)

This edgy piece begins with a fellow describing how he innocently plays with his 3-year old daughter, and participated in her birth, and then devolves into a tale of his sexual experiences.   From beginning to end, his sincerity and honesty make this a very powerful piece.  The final, fearful dance with his daughter works well to tie everything together.

Summerhall (Kings Hall)

12:30

13:40

16

      18. 

KillyMuck (*****)

A poor Northern Ireland girl must deal with an abusive drunken father, and endless societal and institutional prejudice because she Catholic, and lives in public housing.  While the bulk of the time is telling stories of her life, she also intersperses citations of statistics on differences of educational achievement and intelligence between economic classes.   Whether it be a fight with her father, or discovering a porn video when babysitting, the stories have those little touches that make them believable and touching. 

Underbelly Bristo Square

18:25

19:25

26

      19. 

The Other Guys: A Tribute to Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons (*****)

Backed by a small band, four singers provide covers that range from the Four Seasons to the Beatles to recent songs.  Besides having fine voices, they executed the choreography of the early 1960s throughout the performance.  They easily had the whole room up on its feet with many of dancing to their tunes. 

C Chambers St.

21:15

22:10

18

      20. 

Extinguished Things (*****)

A young woman explores the abandoned house and lives of a childhood neighborhood couple she barely knew.  It is a quiet tale with little clues explored to create a portrait of rich, loving, lives.  In the end, we are left quite satisfied.

Summerhall

19:25

20:25

1

      21. 

The Blues Brothers - Live (*****)

Jake and Elwood with three other singers and a septet perform most of the songs from the movie.  I traditionally see this show the first day of my Fringe because they never fail to get me and much of the audience up and dancing by its end.  The songs don’t change from year to year, but neither do the good times!  

C Chambers St.

22:30

23:25

1

      22. 

Big Bite-Size Breakfast Show (Menu 1) (*****)

The premises of the five plays are: an office worker builds a child’s fort from his desk to get away from his work, a lousy playwright inundates a writing contest with his short plays, a childless wife becomes obsessed with doing everything necessary to become pregnant, an old lifeguard seeks to deal with retirement by watching another beach, and the members of a old man’s imagination have trouble coming up with a successful sex fantasy.  I liked this menu best of the three because each of the five found the key concept of the premise and then explored it without becoming repetitious, nor too zany.  Not surprisingly, the lifeguard retirement story was the most poignant for me.

Pleasance Dome

10:30

11:35

1

      23. 

Maz and Bricks by Eva O’Connor (****)

At a rally in Dublin to repeal the Eighth Amendment banning abortion, a fellow stops a woman from throwing a rock, and then the two of them slowly learn of each other’s lives.  I know that sounds trite, but these people are complex, and the issues in their lives are not simple.  Both had a chance to fill out their characters, and grew.

Summerhall

17:55

19:15

14

      24. 

In Loyal Company (****)

After the blitz of Liverpool, a young man joins the army, fights in Singapore, and becomes a Japanese POW in a “Bridge Over the River Kwai” camp.  The actor proves up to the task of blending the roles of the soldier, narrator, and a few secondary characters into a powerful whole.  While the privations of the POW camp take up much of the play, it is his tales of the air attacks on his transport that stand out for me.

Pleasance Courtyard

13:00

14:00

20

      25. 

A Sockful of Custard (****)

Two fellows play Spike Mulligan and the shows director who recount the comedian/writer’s life and routines.  The two create a show that reflects his surreal approach to comedy while still communicating his life’s story.  The use, and abuse, of index cards to layout the structure of the show was an inspired echo of his work.

Pleasance Dome

20:00

21:20

21

      26. 

Timmy (****)

This two hander has a sexy woman trying to be the long term lover with an indecisive man who wants to be just a friend without benefits.  The emphasizes the emotional distance between them by having them never touch, and always speak to the audience instead of each other.  Though he has the stereotypical trouble of males getting in touch with their feelings, that doesn’t get in the way of the nuanced reversal of the stereotypical push for in sex by the two genders.

Assembly George Square

16:15

17:15

25

      27. 

What Girls Are Made Of (****)

The true story of the career of Cora Bissett who at sixteen fronted a minor Indie band, and then dealt with the many pitfalls of the music industry.  Though she had to deal with adversity, she has the courage and persistence that keeps the story moving forward with an upbeat feeling.  With a small back-up band, she still has the voice to cover the music of her life.

Traverse

10:00

11:25

15

      28. 

Famous Puppet Death Scenes (****)

The four puppeteers find a huge range of humorous ways to have a variety of puppets die.  The show is well designed with a combination of unique puppet scenes, interspersed with variations on the death of a specific puppet who gets smarter and smarter about his impending doom.  While they created many novel approaches, I was most impressed by a huge pop-up book with pages that moved closer and closer to a deadly house.

Summerhall (Kings Hall)

20:30

21:40

16

      29. 

Coriolanus Vanishes (****)

A woman relates her abusive childhood, and her own volatile life.  The story is told in dramatically lit snippets separated by blackouts.  The unique lighting design of each scene combine with the blackouts to create a sense of a disjoint life which reinforces our feeling of  a life that can erupt with rage without notice.

Traverse 

11:00

12:15

10

      30. 

A Christmas Carol (****)

Guy Masterson performs Scrooge based on a script that Dickens himself performed as he toured America.  The play highlights Masterson’s ability to portray forceful characters as he alternates between Scrooge and each of the three ghosts.  The show was marred with music and sound effects that drowned out Masterson, and a finicky reverb for the ghosts.  I was told by the director that an illness in another play had forced this production to skip its tech rehearsal, and the sound issues would be addressed.  In that case, the show would surely deserve five stars.

Assembly George Square

12:00

13:15

4

      31. 

Flop (****)

This large farce loosely portrays the events around the impotence trial of an 18th century French count .  This is that rare farce that lets the story itself carry much of the comedic burden, and doesn’t think louder and faster are funnier.  Each character has that little absurd touch that keeps things fun, with a Downs man demonstrating his range of comedy that is both illuminating and good-hearted.

Summerhall

16:55

17:55

17

      32. 

Meek (****)

In a future country with strong religious laws, a factory work is in prison awaiting trial for her seemingly mild subversive work.   With only her conversations with her lawyer and her best friend, we get to both follow her quest to discover who submitted the complaint, and how a government may respond to a social media campaign.  Though the final act tied up loose ends neatly, I would have preferred to have the plottingt less obvious, and some questions left unanswered.

Traverse

10:00

11:25

24

      33. 

Breakfast Plays: Youthquake 2 (****)

Each of the Traverse’s Breakfast Plays presents a reading of two plays, one by an intern and the other by their mentor, that address the lives of millennials.  The intern’s “Squall” has three high school students railing against administrative power as they hide from an active shooter in a designated safe room in their school.  Kieran Hurley’s “Fucking Millennials” has the young madame of a brothel lecture her former head teacher on the political incorrectness of his childhood books.

Traverse

9:00

9:50

22

      34. 

Ulster American (****)

While discussing a play about the Ulster troubles with its director, an American movie star makes an ill advised statement that rattles the English director and the Belfast playwright.   This is an odd mix of slightly farcical characters with polemics that works in most cases.  However, I was annoyed that the bulk of the farce relied on the director’s omission of one sentence in the retelling of the statement.

Traverse

13:30

14:50

21

      35. 

Class (****)

The working class parents of a failing third grader bristle at recommendations by his teacher.  The play provides insight into their three lives by switching to scenes of the son and girl in after school remedial sessions with the teacher.  Even with this additional information, the father and teacher still seem to be too extreme to be real.

Traverse

11:00

12:25

21

      36. 

The Greatest Play in the History of the World (****)

A woman uses pairs of shoes to represent the characters of a story about a hermit author who incessantly watches his neighborhood from his window only to find that time has stopped at 4:40 in the morning.  Each snippet from his life and those of his neighbors contributes to a surprising heartwarming glow of a wonder and love.   The final reassessment of the kids down the street is a great way to end a tale of how the little things in life can change your life.

Traverse

16:15

17:25

15

      37. 

Eleanor's Story: An American Girl in Hitler's Germany (****)

This true story has a 10-year old American girl accompany her family to Germany in 1939, only to find them trapped in Berlin throughout the war.   From giving a seat to old Jew on a bus to attending school after America declared war to being “mother” to a dying German soldier, every vignette had touching details that brought her story alive.  My only complaint was that she did not specify her age until half way through the story, so I had troubles imagining her position during the earlier stories.   

Gilded Balloon

12:30

13:30

27

      38. 

Unspoken (****)

A distraught young woman talks with her remote psychological counselor after her father’s funeral.  As her complex character relates her tale, the counselor also grows nicely.  The mystery of a whisperer to her mother at the funeral is well maintained throughout.

C Royale

12:45

13:30

25

      39. 

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (****)

The large musical has a suave older gigolo tutoring a young rough edged Lothario on how to seduce and extract money from women at a resort.  All the cast does a fine job with both the singing and the choreography.  The subplot of his aide dating a prospective victim adds a touch of love that is sorely needed as a counterpoint to their crassness.

Assembly Hall

11:30

14:00

17

      40. 

Nigel Slater's Toast (****)

The large cast follows the experiences of the food critic as he grows to manhood as the only child of a sickly but loving mother and a conservative businessman.   The heavily choreographed show keeps the events at an emotional distance from the audience with only a few hugs and a flare of anger penetrating its storybook quality.  Nonetheless his latent love of food is apparent throughout the play from his love of candy to his high school cooking class.

Traverse 

10:00

11:25

12

      41. 

Can't Stop, Can't Stop (****)

A college student suffering from obsessive compulsion disorder (OCD) explains how the disease works, and how it affects him.   This show achieves a remarkable balance of his compulsive behavior and his efforts to tell his story.  I was never sure what was an act, and what was his version of the disease, but that didn’t matter.

C Royale

16:35

17:30

19

      42. 

Tobacco Road (****)

Two criminal gangs join forces in post World War I London, and rise to power.  After their gritty presentations of  how they made their initial money, the middle section on their expansion seems a bit too dreamy.  I was amazed with how well they create an entire gang war in such a small space. 

Pleasance Courtyard

15:15

16:15

22

      43. 

Home (****)

After building a room on stage, the show goes on to fill the stage with a complete two-story home that is then used by the large cast and many audience members.  Like a three ring circus, it was both fun and exasperating as many things happened at the same time in different parts of the house.  The appearance and disappearance of people in the bed and shower added a feeling of whimsy to the whole affair.

King’s Theatre

20:00

21:40

25

      44. 

All Change (****)

A daughter spends a morning with her father who lives alone with his unacknowledged Alzheimer’s disease.  The play has just the right mix of moments of clarity with moments of denial.  I found their word game of saying words of greatness a clever device to demonstrate both their shared past and his state of mind.

Assembly George Square

12:20

13:20

11

      45. 

That Woman! Wallis Simpson Duchess of Windsor (****)

Wallis Simpson, for whom Edward VII abdicated his throne to marry, tells her life story from her days Baltimore society girl through her other two marriages to her exile life in Paris.  While she spends time on how her role as Edward’s chaperone evolved into his lover, she wisely devotes more time on her first marriage and its aftermath.  I found her efforts to re-build her life in Shanghai and Peking in the late 1930s surprisingly gritty.   

Gilded Baloon Teviot

17:15

18:30

4

      46. 

The Marilyn Conspiracy (****)

After discovering Marilyn Monroe dead, six people gather in her living room to try to determine what happened before calling the police.  Presumably much of the script tries to construct of chain of events to explain the facts revealed well after the inquest that found her to have committed suicide.  The play becomes unnecessarily repetitive because the script tries to explain the delay in calling the police by having the participants learn of key facts a little at a time and re-hash their thoughts with each new fact.

Assembly George Square

13:45

15:05

5

      47. 

We've Got Each Other (****)

Due to “financial difficulties”, a producer/director must describe the campy musical he planned to present without any actors.  I found this virtual play wonderful fun as he filled in the Bon Jovi music and light design with his clever descriptions.  His own choreography while sitting was surprisingly elaborate and well done.

Pleasance Dome

22:50

23:50

7

      48. 

Westminster Hour (****)

A journalist thinks she know something that will influence the Home Secretary.  The duel between the two is tense with its clever thrusts and parries.  I think I saw this before with a different name, and a more satisfying conclusion.

Sweet Novotel

17:55

18:50

5

      49. 

Women of Lockerbie (****)

Seven years after the tragic downing of the flight over Lockerbie, a mother returns to search for her son’s remains while the women of the town try to stop the American government from burning the clothes of the passengers.  The intertwining of the grief of the mother and that of the women of Lockerbie create a powerful and poignant play.   The final scenes address the needs of both well, and left me teary eyed and satisfied.

C Chambers St.

12:30

13:25

9

      50. 

Trojan Horse (****)

In 1998, an anonymous letter charged that Parkview school in Birmingham was secretly promoting Islamic extremism.  The cast of five easily assume the roles of teachers students, inspectors and accusers to debunk the accusations, and reveal the political motivations behind the government’s reaction to the letter.  The cross examination of the main accuser is quite effective, but the later opening of the students’ results seemed superfluous.

Summerhall

15:15

16:25

10

      51. 

Let's Talk About Porn (****)

A large, young cast provides an even handed view of the porn industry.  They do a great job of mixing not-too-sexual dance with information about the life of its people, and its business dynamics.  The two instances of a couple managing a sex business with children around softened the image, and made it more real.

C Chambers St.

19:50

20:40

22

      52. 

Freeman (****)

One white man and five Black people combine to present scenes of Black mistreatment in the USA and the UK over the past 200 years.  The variety of true stories strengthens the story, but the disorder of presentations and lack of introductions makes it more confusing.  It was surprising that the show touts itself as being about mental health, when all of the examples are based on race.

Pleasance Courtyard

17:00

18:00

22

      53. 

Janis Joplin Full Tilt (****)

Backed by a rock band, an actress signs Joplin’s hits as well as some more obscure songs amidst scenes from her life.  She has a good voice, and the Texas drawl, but, not surprisingly, I couldn’t hear the soulfulness that made Janis’ performances so special.

Assembly Rooms

19:45

21:00

7

      54. 

Dominoes (****)

A high school teacher is confronted with her mixed race heritage as her family and friends learn that she is about to marry a man whose ancestors owned her ancestors as slaves.  The play is even handed as we hear of her fiancé’s pleas of generational innocence, her best friend’s priority of Black Lives Matter, and her own use of “passing” as a white.  The conclusion does not provide a simple solution, but it has clarity.

Assembly George Square

12:00

13:00

12

      55. 

On the Exhale (****)

A professor overly concerned about gun violence has an extreme reaction when it becomes a reality in her personal life.  The plot maintains tension of the play from beginning to end, and the ending is very satisfying.  However, I found the use of the third person narrative, and the relentless tension just too wearing for me.

Traverse

11:00

12:10

23

      56. 

Lights Over Tesco Car Park (****)

A cast of four combines audience participation with some stories about UFO sightings create an amiable show.  By checking with potential participants as they came in, and having good natured non-embarrassing tasks, this show handled audience participation better than any other I have seen.  Their relaxed tone allowed the finale to utilize the audience’s cellphones to create an atmosphere that led to surprising participations

Pleasance Dome

10:50

11:50

14

      57. 

After the Cuts (****)

A husband desperately tries to save his wife’s life after the NHS refuses to help her.  His determination is admirable, and their love palpable.  The play suffers from often being too loud for the reverberating Demonstration Room .

Summerhall

12:00

13:00

1

      58. 

Your Alice (****)

Alice Little alternates between talking with Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) and venturing in Wonderland.   The interactions between the two were touching as Alice is shown to grow to womanhood, but the excerpts from the two books were too disjoint.  The staging made full use of the sumptuous costumes of the whole cast.

Greenside Nicolson

10:20

11:10

20

      59. 

Lost in Thought (****)

A young woman and her mother try to deal with her advancing obsessive compulsion disorder (OCD).  The fact that her obsession is a fear for the safety of her mother, adds a new dimension to the typical solitary obsessions.  Not only does the mother suffer both from worry and her daughter’s inordinate attention, but she learns that the her own actions can have dramatic effect on her daughter. 

Underbelly Cowgate

18:40

19:40

21

      60. 

A Fortunate Man (****)

Two people cite passages from the book, and describe the life of a beloved, but troubled country doctor.  Their admiration for the doctor added immeasurably to the story.  Though the production was sparse, the slideshow of black and white photos behind the two gave a fine sense of the time of the story.

Summerhall

16:30

17:30

1

      61. 

The Aspirations of Daise Morrow(****)

At the funeral of the free spirit in a small Australian town, we see scenes of how she changed peoples lives while a string quartet provides a score.   The four actors seamlessly change between the characters to create a townful of unique characters that we quickly know and understand.   The varied score reflects the range of activities well, and, at its best, conveys the love of life that was at the core of Daise.

Assembly George Square

15:00

16:20

3

      62. 

May I Speak About Dance? (****)

While one man slowly moves, another lampoons the pompous approach to dance taken by some critics and academicians.  Throughout this satire I found the Dutch dry wit most winning.  I loved the scene where the commentator places on post-it notes with references to other dances on innumerable body parts of the dancer.  

Summerhall

19:20

20:10

4

      63. 

Big Bite-Size Breakfast Show (Menu 3) (****)

These five short plays have: 1) A pair of office workers playing in a “quiet’ sandbox for adults only, and must deal with an upset mother; 2)

A man builds a watch that allows him to go backwards in time so he change how he interacted with his lover; 3) The elders of a Christian church decide that if they radicalize they will attract more young people ; 4) One of a pair of goldfish in a fish bowl wants to explore the world; and 5) A troubled couple tries therapy that alternates between exercises, and answering random penetrating questions.  Though all of the stories have a whacky element, all but the churchgoers had me care for the characters.   The three characters in the sandbox have a surprisingly adult conversation that made for a much better play than I would have expected from the premise.

Pleasance Dome

10:30

11:35

3

      64. 

Velvet (****)

A young gay actor must decide to what lengths he is willing to go to advance his career.  The play works well to portray how a young actor could be slyly manipulated as he becomes more and more desperate.  His final power struggle is a fitting climax to the story.

Pleasance Courtyard

14:00

15:00

7

      65. 

Infinita (****)

Starting from his funereal four physical theater artists in masks recreate scenes from his life.  This is an uneven production with some very slow parts from his time in a wheelchair that had me napping, while a crib scene had me alert and laughing.   A scene where a rest home patient tried to steal more drugs from a nurses’ station had the right touch of mayhem. 

Pleasance Courtyard

13:30

15:00

22

      66. 

Shakespeare for Breakfast (****)

The “Taming of the Shrew” becomes the “Taming of the Shoe” as the play is transferred to the owner of a modern shoe store trying to wed off his two daughters.  I was pleasantly surprised to find that there fewer references to British pop culture than in the past which made it more accessible to me.  The succeeded at mixing Shakespearean wit with sophomoric antics to create nice light fare with which to start the day.

C Chambers St.

10:00

10:55

8

      67. 

The Political History of Smack and Crack (****)

Though the play spends some of its time describing how Western governments cynically allowed heroin and cocaine to enter their countries in the 1980s, the bulk of it was following the lives of two junkies.  I found I quickly cared about the large, soft hearted fellow, and the hardhearted apple of his eye.  Their last meeting had just the merest amount of hope that seemed appropriate to their fraught relationship with drugs and each other.

Summerhall

17:30

18:30

9

      68. 

Blackthorn by Charley Miles (****)

A taciturn boy and bright girl grow up as companions in a rural community, but when she chooses to leave to go to college a rift forms.  The play explores their unspoken love without becoming trite.  Though the words are not spoken, her tone and subtle acts constantly convey her love for him.

Summerhall

13:05

14:05

13

      69. 

Bare (****)

To the surprise of his secret gay lover, a popular boy joins him in the try outs for the high school’s play.   The play does a surprisingly good job of covering the manifold complications for the indecisive boy, his lover, and the girl mistakenly interested in him. 

Hill Street Theatre

20:20

22:30

20

      70. 

Your Bard (****)

A fellow describes the life and times of Shakespeare with particular attention to lifestyle of acting companies in Elizabethan times.

Assembly Hall

16:20

17:20

5

      71. 

The Duke (****)

Sitting at a desk, a fellow tells a convoluted story of his mother and the porcelain statue of the Duke of Wellington treasured by his father.

Pleasance Courtyard

12:45

13:45

7

      72. 

My Left Nut (****)

A young fellow learns to deal with a swollen testicle, coming of age, and the death of his father.  The actor does a good job of differentiating the many characters of his life.  His interactions with his widowed mother throughout the story were particularly touching.

Summerhall

13:15

14:10

19

      73. 

Awakening (****)

Underbelly Bristo Square

14:35

15:35

25

      74. 

Mengele (****)

This two hander has the former Auschwitz doctor defend his war crimes while talking to a mysterious woman who seemingly saved him from drowning.

Assemble George Square

12:20

13:20

5

      75. 

Narcissist in the Mirror (****)

A bright, beautiful young actress goes through a seemingly endless series of lovers as she tries to find her own self worth.  The play intersperses rhyming with prose in a clever, but also self-defeating way because it interfered with my suspension of disbelief.  It is ironic that actress was the playwright, since, like her love life, her cleverness makes her fictional life unreal.

Pleasance Courtyard

15:15

16:15

11

      76. 

Orlando (****)

Rebecca Vaughn portrays the immortal character who winds his/her life from the Elizabethan times to the present.  I am always amazed at Vaughn’s stamina and ability to perform at a top level for such long stretches—and without breaking a sweat!  On the other hand, without another actor to provide some counterpoint, each play becomes monotonous in its wordiness.  

Assembly Roxy

11:30

13:00

6

      77. 

Revenants (***)

In countryside of 1942 England, Queen Mary, her chauffeur, and a gay actor are confronted by a Black American soldier with a bleeding back and a machine gun.  The play does a good job of comparing the plight of Blacks in America with that of homosexuals in Britain at the time.  The final act seems too preachy. 

Pleasance Dome

17:00

18:30

24

      78. 

No Kids (***)

This is a physical theater piece about a gay couple trying to decide if they wish to adopt a child.  While the dancing is fine, the section on coming out seemed superfluous to the subject at hand, and made the play too long.

Pleasance Forth

15:40

17:00

14

      79. 

Brexit (***)

Pleasance Courtyard

13:30

14:45

26

      80. 

Rat Pack – Live (***)

Backed by a ten piece band, three men sing the songs of Dean Martin,, Sammy Davis Jr. and Frank Sinatra.  None of them try to impersonate their singer though the Sinatra singer does a reasonable job of matching Frank’s style.  Though a couple of the songs didn’t seem linked with its singer, particularly Dean singing “King of the Road,” the crowd still seemed happy.

C Chambers St.

20:00

20:55

18

      81. 

Our Man in Havana (***)

Pleasance Courtyard

11:00

12:00

27

      82. 

Unspoken (***)

Veterans

Pleasance Courtyard

15:15

16:30

26

      83. 

Picasso's Women (***)

An early lover, wife, and later mistress present half-hour monologues about their time with the artist.  The monologues have little drama, but are highly informative.

Fruitmarket Gallery

19:00

20:30

24

      84. 

The House (***)

An older married couple sign the papers to sell their beloved house only to find that the buyers will not do what they expect.  The words are sharp, but this one note farce seems too predictable in its evenly paced escalation of exasperation.

Assembly George Square

14:50

16:00

23

      85. 

The Archive of Educated Hearts (***)

An audience of five in a garden shed learn how all of the women of storyteller’s family have dealt with breast cancer.  The gentle review is aided by family photos slowly added to a pile on table at the center of the shed.  The cluttered shed is well suited to the short tale.

Pleasance Courtyard

12:30

12:50

18

      86. 

Portrait's in Motion (***)

A German fellow displays his collection of flipbooks on a video screen while providing background stories on each.  He constructs flipbooks by taking three photos per second for twelve seconds, and then securing the photos together into a booklet that he can bend and flip through to create a short animation.  He was right, that the final photo seems to usually convey the essence of the person photographed.

Summerhall

16:15

17:30

16

      87. 

Stardust (***)

Pleasance Dome

16:20

17:20

27

      88. 

Love Song to Lavender Menace (***)

The two store clerks of the first gay bookstore in Edinburgh reminisce about the events surrounding its founding, and the changes it saw.  The vast majority of the audience loved it, including Tim, but many of the references were aspects of the gay culture that were lost on me.

Summerhall

12:55

14:10

23

      89. 

Buried - A New Musical (***)

Two serial killers decide to join forces, but have troubles romantically.  Despite their excellent voices and good music, the instances of them killing innocent people prevents this show from gaining any tempo.  Only the final act works to resolve the conflict.

Underbelly (Ermintrude)

17:10

18:25

23

      90. 

The Canterville Ghost (***)

An 19th century ventriloquist, magician, psychic, and singer perform their music hall acts, and present Oscar Wilde’s tale of a ghost that doesn’t scare two children.  Each act seems appropriate for its time, and is well executed, albeit a little simple for our modern times.  Overall, this is a straightforward interpretation of the play in a setting of the time Welles wrote it.

Pleasance Courtyard

14:45

16:00

17

      91. 

White (***)

The daughter of a Jamaican man and Irish woman describes how she has come to grips with her mixed race heritage.  She does a good job of conveying how her notion of herself evolved from a sense of uniqueness in childhood to being forced to identify with her Black heritage now.  Though she has a good voice, the use of looping once again disrupts the flow of the story.

Pleasance Courtyard

11:30

12:15

18

      92. 

Revelations (***)

A lapsed Christian fellow who grew up with a lesbian, and is now close friends with her lover speaks of their time times together as it led to her pregnancy.  His gentle defense of his Christian upbringing as warm versus cool gave the whole story a pleasant feeling.

Summerhall

17:40

18:50

18

      93. 

Henry (***)

A renowned puppeteer teaches a master class on objects as puppets with two assistants while dealing with the death of his remote actor father.   He did teach me how to imbue life into objects, but the story line with his father was weak.  His constant repetition of his lines along with the repetition of slowly moving objects to enliven them deadened the whole show.

 

 

 

 

      94. 

American Idiot (***)

This musical has a couple of guys rejecting life in suburbia and reveling in the darker side of city life.  The band was great, but they drowned out the singers most of the time.  Because the cast was too large for the space, and the choreography too fast for the dancers, most of the dancing looked like individuals running around trying to do their assigned moves in a first rehearsal.

C Chambers St.

13:40

15:25

18

      95. 

I am Not Your Woman (***)

Greenside Infirmary

18:25

19:25

22

      96. 

User Not Found (***)

We donned headphones and peered at the supplied smartphones to learn of how a fellow dealt with deciding whether to delete all of the social media content of his dead lover.

Traverse at Jeelie Piece Café

20:00

21:30

8

      97. 

Blackout (***)

Five actors take turns describing how their characters dealt with their alcoholism.

Summerhall

16:20

17:20

9

      98. 

OTOSOTR (***)

Underbelly Cowgate

18:40

19:40

23

      99. 

First Snow (***)

The family and friends of a Quebec woman gather together at her house to hear her surprising announcement.  Much of the play is taken up with a decidedly one sided argument about Quebec and Scottish nationalism. 

Summerhall (Kings Hall)

18:10

19:40

16

     100. 

Simon Callow in De Profundis (***)

Callow sits in a chair and recites Oscar Wilde’s very long letter to his lover.  I found the letter to be nicely written, but rambling, and, after only three hours of sleep, soporific.  However, Tim loved it.

Assembly Rooms

12:30

14:00

15

     101. 

Tremor (***)

A woman shows up at an old lover’s door to discuss their past.  Too much of the play is spent by her beating around the bush before we get to the meat of her problem.  I did like that the it provided two ways of approaching their problem without taking sides, despite one of the solutions being nationalist.

Summerhall

16:05

17:05

13

     102. 

Chihuahua (***)

This one woman show has her alternating between a modern day waitress, and a 1905 well born, but impoverished, society woman to see how each deals with the financial adversities of their lives.

Assembly Roxy

15:50

16:50

7

     103. 

Flies (***)

Pleasance Courtyard

17:00

18:00

26

     104. 

Ailsa Benson is Missing (***)

A 14-year old girl must deal with the discovery that her classmate is missing.  The part of the story centered on the girl works well, but the surrounding section dealing with the narrator contribute little, and the legal evidence is contrived.

Assembly Rooms

14:20

15:20

15

     105. 

Fast (***)

This is the true story of a quack in Washington state in 1912 who ending up killing her patients by starving them to death in her sanitorium.  The actress maintains a sense of self-righteousness of purpose and rebellion against a male dominated medical profession that sets her apart from stereotypical serial killers.  It was amazing that she was allowed to continue despite newspaper headlines.

theSpace at Niddry Street

20:20

21:10

23

     106. 

Breakfast Plays: Youthquake 1 (***)

“Old Enough” had a 25-year old man and a slightly younger woman in a hotel room both celebrating and regretting the advent of a law that raised the age of consent to 25.  “Grout” was literally foregettable.

Traverse

9:00

9:50

21

     107. 

Neverwant (***)

Reminiscent of “1984”, in the future society has chosen to outlaw emotions because they are inefficient, but one fellow falls in love with his officemate.  This mix of over-the-top characters with a sincere man and woman with whom we are supposed to care just does not work.

Pleasance Courtyard

14:15

15:15

9

     108. 

Starfish (***)

A young woman has trouble being faithful, and then a miscarriage makes her life even less tenable.

C Royale

14:00

15:00

8

     109. 

F**k You, Pay Me (***)

A stripper tells of both the onstage and backstage life in a modern strip club.

Assembly Rooms

15:25

16:25

8

     110. 

Theatre Uncut: Women on Power (***)

The show has actors reading three scripts dealing with women in various states of empowerment: a homeless woman renting a room from a man with sex as payment, a successful woman plumber, and a female student questioning the justification for her education.

Traverse

10:00

10:50

13

     111. 

Sticks and Stones (***)

When a woman tells a non-politically correct joke in a business presentation, she is confronted with unexpected repercussions.  Though the events that follow seem adsorb, they are not too far from reality to resonate.  While the initial use of dance poses is fun, they are over done, and the whole play goes on too long.

Summerhall

14:30

15:40

13

     112. 

Hunch (***)

A woman who blames her indecisiveness for a tragedy dreams of becoming a super hero who helps people make decisions.

Assembly Roxy

17:05

18:05

7

     113. 

The BasementTapes (***)

While packing up her recently deceased grandmother’s basement, a woman discovers cassette tapes that change her views of her family.

Summerhall

18:30

19:30

17

     114. 

Closed Doors (***)

A trio of musicians sing the story of a neighborhood of subsidized apartments in which the residents are all suspicious of each other, and keep to themselves.  The lyrics, when I could hear them, and musicianship are excellent, but the drummer often drowns out the lyrics.

Summerhall

19:45

20:45

14

     115. 

The Death of Edgar Allan Poe (***)

Poe’s life is told with a large cast re-enacting his stories and life.

C too

18:50

19:50

13

     116. 

Loop (***)

We follow three generations of a family as one person from each deals with leaving home.

Underbelly Cowgate

17:20

18:20

21

     117. 

The Journey (***)

A loving couple must deal with a nine-month journey together to and from another galaxy.  The show starts with an announcement about a missing cast member, and continues to break the fourth wall throughout.  In the end, the wall is broken so often, that we are left with actors emoting to no effect.

Pleasance Dome

17:40

18:40

13

     118. 

A Generous Lover (***)

A transvestite tells of dealing with his manic friend, Orpheus, both in and out of psychiatric hospitals.    

Summerhall

16:10

17:10

18

     119. 

Loving Monica (***)

Four actors explore the life of Monica Lewinsky, the intern with whom Bill Clinton had an affair.  The four take turns playing Monica as they attempt follow Lewinsky’s recent TED talk admonition to treat people with compassion.   While she is treated with understanding, Linda Tripp, who taped their phone conversations, and Kenneth Starr, the prosecutor who released the tapes, are presented as just evil people.

C Aquila

20:25

21:25

17

     120. 

Dusty and Shirley (***)

Rose Theatre

22:30

23:30

25

     121. 

Dressed (***)

Underbelly Cowgate

18:00

19:00

25

     122. 

Bubble Show for Adults Only (***)

A man and woman explore the artistic and sexy possibilities with bubbles that can be durable, large, and/or filled with fog.  The first half is great fun, and inventive, but the second half seems to be mostly a retread.

C Chambers St.

22:15

23:15

19

     123. 

Ad Libido (***)

A 30-year old woman describes her fruitless efforts to have an orgasm with men.  Since she never addressed masturbation, I never could get a sense of her real plight. 

Pleasance Courtyard

15:30

16:30

6

     124. 

The Cloak and Dagger Show (***)

After an hour tour of the Grass Market describing it and the filthy life there in the mid-1700s, we watched a two hander about a young man seeking revenge for the murder of his brother by a Jacobite.

Sweet Grassmarket

20:50

22:50

5

     125. 

Maureen Lipman is "Up For It" (***)

The actress/raconteur tells jokes and offers a few tales from her life, but often surrenders the stage to some musicians.   Since I had not seen her work, many of the references in her jokes found no purchase.  While the musicians were excellent, they were an unwanted interruption for an audience who came to hear Lipman.

Assembly Rooms

17:45

18:45

8

     126. 

Lovecraft (Not the Sex Shop in Cardiff) (***)

A young woman playfully reviews the scientific findings on the biochemicals involved with the feeling of love.

Summerhall

21:00

22:00

1

     127. 

Elvis: Young and Even More Beautiful  (***)

With a guitar that he can barely play, and overload background music, the singer does a credible job of imitating Elvis.  His performance was marred as he appeared to be either drunk or suffering from lack of sleep.  He often sang to his sound man at the side of the stage instead of the audience, and with twenty minutes to go started to frequently look at his watch.

Frankenstein Pub

19:30

20:30

2

     128. 

A Virgin’s Guide to Rocky Horror (***)

This casual version of the campy cult classic provides guidance for the audience of the interactive parts that have developed over the years.  The narrator does a good job of integrating the audience into the experience.

Hill Street Theatre

21:10

22:10

4

     129. 

The James Taylor Story (***)

This show alternates between clips from a video of Taylor’s life, and a  singer with a guitar performing his songs.  Twenty minutes into the show the fire alarm ended it prematurely so I cannot tell whether the show may deserve four stars.

theSpace@Symposium Hall

15:55

16:45

4

     130. 

Big Bite-Size Breakfast Show (Menu 2) (***)

The five short plays have: 1) A man obsessed with the authenticity of battle re-enactments competing for the part of a king with a woman who is there just on a lark;  2) Three astronauts about re-enter Earth’s atmosphere after being away for many years must confront what their lives will be like on Earth; 3) A man tends to try new things only once, and his wife is particularly frustrated; 4) A man and woman sit next to each other on a park bench and think about each other in flowery romantic language, but only say brief, non-committal things to each other; 5) On her wedding day, a bride is accosted by each of her former lovers trying to get her to leave with them.  Three of the plays repeat a gag too many times.  In particular, after two suitors show up for the bride, the succeeding suitors add little.

Pleasance Dome

10:30

11:35

2

     131. 

Are There More of You? (***)

This solo show has four monologues about the lives of four older women..  She did a fine job of differentiating the characters, but the stories themselves are literally forgettable.

Assembly (Baillie Room)

11:10

12:20

26

     132. 

Feed (***)

A woman’s Internet story about a current Palestinian boy goes viral because of an photo she reused from 5 years ago.  The first half of the show that addresses the cynical manipulation of Internet media is great, but the second half dissolves into chaotic farce.  

Pleasance Dome

14:00

15:00

24

     133. 

Trump Lear (***)

A comedian plays himself being forced to replay his play about Donald Trump under the watchful eyes of the president.

Pleasance Courtyard

11:40

12:45

20

     134. 

Doors Opening (***)

We see the current lives of the six people in a stuck elevator portrayed in turn.  This feels like a college play where the instructor had to find parts for ten students.

Greenside Nicolson

11:30

12:15

13

     135. 

Alabama God Damn (***)

A Black man returns to his hometown in Alabama to attend the funeral of his close friend, and finds his death suspicious.  This combination of music, rednecks, and southern stereotypes is mildly entertaining.   Though the story as a mystery works, the hijinks and music hurt the show.

Pleasance Dome

11:00

12:00

25

     136. 

Romeo and Juliet (***)

This heavily abridged version is well performed by the two actors, but the soundscape drowns out many of their lines.

Zoo Charteris

20:55

21:55

15

     137. 

(even) Hotter (***)

Two lesbians interviewed people about sex, and now mix verbatim recounts with performances alluding to their own love and sexual approaches.  The audience loved it, but I found it too self-involved.

Bedlam

21:30

22:30

10

     138. 

Proxy (***)

An actress presents a tale of a poor Arkansas woman who makes her daughter ill so that the mother will receive attention from the medical world—a mental illness called Munchausen by proxy syndrome.  The actress’ inability to differentiate the characters with props or accents make the tale unnecessarily difficult to follow.

Gilded Balloon

11:00

12:00

9

     139. 

Care Not, Fear Naught (***)

We follow Anne Bonny’s short career as a pirate.  Through no fault of her own, the young pretty lead with her long hair, just never looked manly enough to fool a pirate crew who would dread the bad luck of having a woman as part of the crew.  That said, the story is well told, and informative.

Greenside @ Nicholson Square

22:00

22:50

6

     140. 

Electrolyte (***)

A lost young woman takes up the offer of a bandmate, and travels to London to find her mother.  The music sometimes has a good beat, but is generally unappealing and disrupts the meandering story. 

Pleasance Dome

17:30

18:40

6

     141. 

Ruki (***)

A Gypsy tramp tells of his life as a friend of a champion Gypsy boxer in Nazi Germany.  His speech was difficult to understand, so the power of the story was greatly diminished for me.

C cubed

20:30

21:25

13

     142. 

Whisky & Gin Tasting Cabaret (***)

Between songs performed by three young women, the audience is given three tastings of gin.  There was no whisky offered, and the singers were of varied quality.

Hill Street Theatre

22:40

23:50

4

     143. 

Wired (***)

I simply could not understand the brogues used in this story of a daughter in the army, and her mother.  I often fell asleep, but Tim thought it pretty good.

Army@ The Fringe

14:30

15:30

16

     144. 

Onstage Dating  (***)

The promiscuous comedienne asks an audience member on stage, and then goes through the motions of a full seduction including wine and getting almost naked in a bed on stage.  The whole thing feels awkward to watch.  The young man she chose was so good natured that he seemed like a plant, but wasn’t.

Underbelly Cowgate

21:20

22:20

2

     145. 

Drifting Towers (***)

In a woman about to graduate from college, and her friend are in the 99th level of a hundred level video game as they mix acting as their avatars in the game with their real life interactions.  The avatar recreation of the old game is cheesy, but fun.  The real life part of the story is rather thin.

C Aquila

15:00

16:00

2

     146. 

The Fishermen (***)

After a long absence a Nigerian man who is an accused murderer secretly returns to his village and talks with his younger brother about their lives and the events that led to his life on the run.  The story is interesting, but their accents were too strong for me understand much of what they had to say.

Assembly George Square

13:20

14:30

3

     147. 

Status  (***)

An American fellow compares his experiences in foreign lands with that of the natives.  For a substantial part of the show he accompanies himself with an electric guitar that is so loud you cannot hear his words.

Summerhall

19:55

21:15

3

     148. 

Wrecked (***)

Six of us climbed into a wrecked compact SUV to have the driver tell a tale of how the car came to be in its current condition.  The story builds nicely, and the conclusion is satisfying though surprising.  However, I sat in the back next to a noisy fan, and missed many of the quiet things the driver said as well as the playback from a audio player in her lap. 

Gilded Balloon at The Museum Crash Site

13:30

14:15

10

     149. 

Margo: Half Woman, Half Beast (***)

A singer tells of her life in 1932 Berlin as she lives among the Jews of the cabaret scene.  Half of the play she sings songs from that era.

Assembly Rooms

17:55

18:55

12

     150. 

Earnest & Wilde: Let's Face the Music (and Franz) (***)

A singer and her pianist tell of the facts leading up to the assassination of Archduke Franz

C Royale

19:55

20:55

12

     151. 

Chamberlain… Peace in Our Time (***)

Scenes of Neville Chamberlain talking to his aide about his political career alternate with singer singing songs from the 1930s that relate to the events.  The problem here is that Neville Chamberlain was a lousy orator, and the actor playing him stayed in character throughout the show.

Greenside Nicolson

17:20

18:15

11

     152. 

Dean Friedman's 40th Anniversary "Well, Well Said the Rocking Chair" (***)

Dean provided a few stories of his life, but mostly sang all the songs from the album and some of his others.  Much of the audience, including Debbie, could sing along with him, and had a wonderful time.  As an initiate, I found most of his work good natured but lacking.

Sweet Grassmarket

19:30

20:50

10

     153. 

Three Women Three Myths (***)

Three American women with mixed race ancestry said which race/culture they identify with, and then provide a myth from that culture.  The whole seems too impromptu, and lacks a sense of focus.

C Royale

12:15

13:15

8

     154. 

Behind our Skin (***)

A Moroccan immigrant in France, and a French woman in London describe their challenges as immigrants.  Their strong accents and their dull stories made it difficult for me to keep awake.

C Aquila

14:00

14:50

4

     155. 

East Belfast Boy (**)

An Irishman alternates between break dancing, and telling of his current life, and the birth of his daughter.  I am sort of guessing about the plot because I missed many of his words because the background soundtrack was too loud, he had a strong accent, he often spoke softly, and he often spoke while facing away from.  He sure could dance well though.

Summerhall

21:00

22:00

14

     156. 

A Joke (**)

Three comedians find themselves in some extra dimensional white room, and try to figure out what they should do.  With two actors from sci-fi TV series I loved, I had high hopes for this, but it is just too scattered.  McCoy is still a good clown, and many of the jokes were funny, but the premise made the whole thing leadened.

Assembly Rooms

16:25

17:35

12

     157. 

Breakfast Plays: Youthquake 3 (***)

“The Things I Would Tell You (By Some Young British Muslim Women)” had three monologues about how each woman did not feel  accepted into the British society because they were Muslim.  I am sorry to say that by the time “Lurker” came along the monologues had lulled me to sleep.

Traverse

9:00

9:50

23

     158. 

[insert slogan here] (**)

A gentle fellow uses a video designer, a sound designer, and audience participation to create a video advertisement to compete with the Volvo ads he loves.  His approach is nice, but the two designers seemed to compete to overwhelm the project.

Zoo Charteris

18:10

19:15

15

     159. 

Mungo Legend of Glasgow's Saint (**)

The large cast of this Catholic acting company from Glasgow spend two hours presenting the life of a 6th century church leader, including the three miracles that led to his sainthood.  I appreciated the sincerity of their efforts.

St. Patrick's Church

13:30

15:30

12

     160. 

The Rockford File (**)

Two guitarists created songs based on scenarios that might havppened in the James Garner TV series.  Their banter is cheesy and poorly written.  The lead guitarist, Rockford, plays well and has an adequate voice, but the bass player had no voice and occasionally played an acoustic guitar that sounded awful.

Pleasance Dome

14:50

15:50

19

     161. 

Showmanship(**)

A circus psychic eschews the normal trappings of her profession to talk about hope.  Though she is constantly gesticulating, her presentation is repetitive and monotonous. 

C Royale

17:40

18:35

19

     162. 

Fallen Fruit (**)

A Bulgarian woman describes life before and after the fall of the Berlin Wall.  The show reflects her gentle personality, and seems to lack the power that such events should impart to a show.  Her unintentionally ineffectual tosses at a wall of small cardboard boxes epitomizes this problem.

Summerhall

11:25

12:25

7

     163. 

Everything Not Saved (**)

This show is about how memory, and how it can change over time, but don’t look for a story here.  It is a mess with arguments about Rasputin juxtaposed with three actors repeating their simultaneous overdramatic deaths.   I will admit they addressed memory, but I found the mix too esoteric for my tastes.

Summerhall

17:50

18:50

10

     164. 

European Citizen Pop Song (**)

A Belgian woman travelled the EU to gather musicians to provide backup for her song about European unity, and now asks her audience to help sing the song.  She is a exuberant and quirky, but the song is seemingly intentionally horrible, and our participation doesn’t help.

Summerhall

18:00

19:00

1

     165. 

Nele Needs a Holiday: The Musical (**)

After her band breaks up, a young Belgian musician decides that she can better achieve fame by moving to London.  She is likable, but the story is thin, and the lyrics poor.

Summerhall

22:15

23:10

14

     166. 

The Approach (**)

We rotate through pairs of three women talking about their mundane lives and trying to deal with the enmity between the two sisters.  While the acting may be fine, the story is banal.  The fact that much of the final conversation is taken from previous conversations was supposed to be an indictment of their shallowness, but also serves as a reminder of how little was offered in the play itself.

Assembly (Rainy)

13:25

14:30

6

     167. 

Frieda Loves Ya! (**)

A stripper meanders through a good hearted, but amateur show.

Underbelly Bristo Square

22:25

23:25

21

     168. 

Hymns for Robots (**)

This is the life story of the woman who was hired by the BBC to create electronic music, including the theme for Dr. Who.  While she was certainly a brilliant trailblazer, the show seems as dull as her much of her esoteric music.

C Aquila

16:20

17:20

2

     169. 

Fall of Eagles (**)

The large, young cast relies on a lot music hall slapstick and songs to present a little information about the three main royal families of turn of the century continental Europe: the Hapsburgs of the Austrian-Hungarian Empire, the Romanovs of Russia, and the Hohenzollern of Prussia.  The songs and comedy were just to sophomoric for me.

Gilded Balloon

11:00

12:00

19

     170. 

Harpy (**)

An old woman who hoards everything must live in her clutter and deal with a social worker.  This repeatedly put all of us to sleep.

Underbelly

16:00

17:00

21

     171. 

Monsieur Somebody (**)

Three convicts tell a tales of their best lies.  The show devotes most of its time to a Frenchman who repeatedly dupes a wife while attacking her husband.

Venue 13

21:30

22:30

12

     172. 

The Last Straw (**)

Two people argue in a variety of ways.   Another Summerhall Demonstration Room show that didn’t take into account the reverberations in the room.

Summerhall

15:00

15:55

1

     173. 

Baby Face (*)

An energetic actress addresses the infantilizing of woman by the media by acting like a baby, and then a child.  Her initial long scream in the echoing Demonstration Room sets the tone for a show that is too loud and too wild to communicate anything other than the unbridled energy of a child.

Summerhall

13:30

14:20

1

     174. 

Let's Inherit the Earth (*)

Four actors alternate between two adsorb scenarios both based in a world where global warming has caused the seas to rise so that few people are left.  Though the actors worked hard, neither story had any merit.

Pleasance Forth

12:20

13:40

14

     175. 

Solarplexus: An Alternative Energy Play (*)

The son and daughter compete with each other to save their back-to-nature father from the evil corporation that threatens the ecology of the whole world.  It is a mess with cartoon characterizattions, and subplots that are confusing and contribute nothing.

Zoo Charteris

19:35

20:35

15

     176. 

Very Blue Peter (*)

Three disgruntled hosts of the children’s show takeover the TV studio and attempt to revive the show with slipshod allusions to its icons.  With the mean host dominating the other drunk woman host and crying depressed host, the show feels mean throughout, and any fun is quickly squelched. 

Gilded Balloon

23:15

0:15

8

     177. 

Flight (*)

The audience of 21 are ushered into a shipping container that holds a replica of one side of an airliner fuselage, complete with 7 rows of seats.  With the plane in complete darkness, the audience listens on headphones as they hear takeoff, and some weirdness.  There is nothing here that merits your time or money.

Summerhall

21:00

21:30

6

 

I am a 65-year old retired Computer Science lecturer from the University of California in Davis who thinks even a bad play is better than no play at all.  I have been to the Fringe twelve times before.   In 2005, I fulfilled a dream of seeing an entire Fringe Festival.  Since then, I have been here for the whole Fringe every year except 2007.  I have learned to devote most days to only one venue to maximize the number of performances I can see.  I expect this year to be similar to last—many performances, and many new friends.

 

After attending more than 1000 performances, I have a much better idea of my biases and prejudices in the role of a critic.  To limit my analyzing shows during their performances as much as possible, I have intentionally avoided any training in criticism and the dramatic arts, both formal and informal.  I find that I prefer fact to fiction, innovation to repetition, coherence to creativity, the concrete to the symbolic, and cleverness to depth.  I realize that many of these are antithetical to the spirit of the Fringe, but I cannot deny my nature.  In particular, I just do not like shows that push the bounds of creativity beyond my ability to make sense of them.  Because I choose to fill time slots with whatever is available, I still expose myself to such shows, and do not mind.  However, I do feel a little guilty giving a low rating to a show on which a company has worked so hard, and with such commitment.  Nevertheless, I envision that that is my role—to accurately report my enjoyment so that others may better use my ratings.  In all but a very few cases, I admire the effort of each company, and wish them well.

 

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